fluorescent fog

Filter By Sets
all photos presented works installation views
Do Thanh Lang
Note 12
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
120 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 15
2020
oil, acrylic, and double component resin on canvas
60 x 80 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 3
2019
acrylic on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
31 x 40.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 8
2019
acrylic and oil on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
30.5 x 40.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 5
2019
acrylic and oil on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
30.5 x 40 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 7
2019
acrylic and oil on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
40.5 x 40.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 13
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
60.5 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Note 14
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
60.5 x 120.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Film 7
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 3
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 4
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 5
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 9
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 1
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 8
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 11
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 6
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 2
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 10
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Film 12
2020
acrylic, oil and cyanotype on PVC transparent sheet
21 x 28 cm; 170 x 40 x 2 with plexiglass frame
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
120 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
120 x 140 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
acrylic on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
115.5 x 145.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
140.5 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
acrylic and oil on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
91.5 x 126 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
120 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
120 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
120 x 120 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2020
acrylic and oil on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
41 x 50.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2016
oil and acrylic on paper and PVC transparent sheet
144 x 144 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2015
oil and acrylic on paper and PVC transparent sheet
144 x 145 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2016
oil and acrylic on canvas and PVC transparent sheet
110 x 110 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2015
acrylic and oil on canvas and PVC transparent sheet, wooden frames
170.5 x 263.5 cm
Do Thanh Lang
Untitled
2017
oil, acrylic, and epoxy resin on canvas
70 x 95 cm

SYNOPSIS

It is by lending his body to the world that the artist changes the world into paintings.

– Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Eye and Mind

An imaginary scenario: the artist frees his body from Alberti’s Frame – a geometric instrument that determines perspective. He shoots himself into the Void, where neither logic nor horizon nor light nor shadow exists. His body is floating, stretching, thrashing, bouncing, his buttocks hoisting in the air in an attempt to touch the surfaces of his surrounding environment. He utilises the sensorium to feel his flight through space–time. A fog appears as soon as he escapes that blindfold of a Frame, when he is yet to reconstruct a sense of stability. In that ambiguous, liminal space, he learns to lay out new horizons by simulating surfaces and having his subjects interact with those surfaces. They do not follow the principles of the convergence point. They follow his random rhythm.

***

A referential scenario: the artist covers that indeterminate sphere of fog with countless layers of fluorescent paint. These layers – part opaque, part translucent – allow light to pierce through. They coalesce. The subjects Lãng lets emerge from his new horizon are now filled with excitement. They hug, dance, sprawl across those fluorescent layers of paint like citizens of the New, Modern, Twentieth Century World. In those years, thanks to the Industrial and Technological Revolution, the entertainment industry focused on exploiting methods of illumination/projection, and the illusions from which it came. Synthetic substances, colours, and artificial lights relentlessly stimulate the senses, prompting the inhabitants of the Twentieth Century to endlessly notice and perceive their world. That perception, glaringly luminous, blends reality and illusion. When the body reaches its limits of endurance, when the senses refuse to take in more signals, they are paralysed. The artist instantly freezes them in their postures, static to the extreme.

***

A re-produced scenario: the painter slides his fingers across a smartphone touchscreen. He is hunting for floating objects in the world of data in order to replicate them in his fluorescent Void. He whispers to Facebook’s algorithm: ‘Decode the reading of data in my eyes!’ Needless to say, with its sophisticated ability to track and surveil, the algorithm has of course been constantly decoding him, trying to identify the object/subject/scene implied by the movement of his fingers. He whispers to a world constructed by predictive algorithms: ‘Slide along with what my eyes see!’ Characters/Things/Landscapes, as a result, replicate their own images in the vault of data – the virtual morgue – and slide from the glass screen to the shiny surface of resin, of negative film, of PVC sheets.

– Arlette Quynh-Anh Tran