That Little Distance

Filter By Sets
all photos presented works installation views
That Little Distance, no. 3
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 5 + 1 AP
56.5 x 80 cm
That Little Distance, no. 7
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 5 + 1 AP
56.5 x 80 cm
That Little Distance, no. 9
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 5 + 1 AP
80 x 56.5 cm
That Little Distance, no. 21
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 3 + 1 AP
79 x 110 cm
That Little Distance, no. 23
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 5 + 1 AP
56.5 x 80 cm
That Little Distance, no. 25
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 5 + 1 AP
56.5 x 80 cm
Untitled Still. Life., no. 1
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 7 + 1 AP
71 x 50.5 cm
Untitled Still. Life., no. 2
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 7 + 1 AP
71 x 50.5 cm
Untitled Still. Life., no. 3
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 7 + 1 AP
71 x 50.5 cm
Untitled Still. Life., no. 6
2013
archival pigment ink on Hahnemühle Photo Rag paper, edition of 7 + 1 AP
71 x 50.5 cm

SYNOPSIS

Galerie Quynh is pleased to present “That Little Distance,” an exhibition of new work by Hanoi-based photographer Jamie Maxtone-Graham. This is the artist’s first exhibition in Ho Chi Minh City and his first solo at the gallery.

Drawing from two bodies of work “Still. Life.” and “That Little Distance,” the exhibition features photographs produced in the derelict setting of a former factory where the only light source was daylight passing through a large, north-facing window. Each photo was taken with an exposure of 15 to 20 seconds. With a nod to 17th century Dutch painting and the memento mori genre, the dramatic light in the photos lends the work a sacred and serene air.

A visual play on the fragility of our daily experience, “Still. Life.” depicts seemingly disparate objects bound together into a structure marked by tension. In “That Little Distance,” Maxtone-Graham focuses on enigmatic portraits of individuals with his own presence subdued in deep shadow. In a palette of soft, muted colors and rich textures, a poet, gangster, artist collective and gay couple are just some of the players in the artist’s haunting, illusionary world. These simple, quiet scenes belie the profound themes at play where history, art history, prejudice, human relationships, nature and time itself collide in small performances of stillness.